If you are like me when I started looking for a teaching job in late 1991, you polish up your resume, get the credential file in order, and subscribe to a newspaper or website for easy access to the classifieds. However, the one difference between myself and the new teaching graduate in 2011 is economy. In late 1991, during the setting of Bush Sr.’s only term in the White House, the economy was on the rebound. Unemployment was starting to wane, and a new spirit of optimism began to take shape in this country. That new spirit of optimism became personified as William Jefferson Clinton.

Twenty years later, another Democratic president oversees the economic landscape. This time, however, many advances in technology has changed the face of employment. Sure, credential files still exist. New teaching graduates still sift through the help wanted section of the newspaper. The unemployed still wait in long lines. Only now we have some new players on hand. The internet, Facebook, and other employment websites have cropped up to add to the mix. The results remain the same, though. Too many new teachers looking for work, too few available teaching jobs. The recent graduate is then faced with the choice of going back to graduate school and hoping that when he is through with his education, the economic forecast will look brighter, or take work outside his field. In-Person Tutoring is to remain in the field of Education by substitute teaching. This gives them that “foot in”, but does not afford them the chance to step up and call a classroom their own. Bring in the one alternative that allows one to practice their teaching skills and call it heir own WITHOUT their own classroom:a job in tutoring. Tutoring helps new teachers gain experience, stay fresh in their teaching skills, and still earn a decent part-time or even full-time salary teaching students. Is it their ideal classroom? Probably not. As the old commercial once stated, it’s the “next best thing to being there”.